YOUTH SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Talk with young people early and often about the dangers of different substances. With your help, we can make sure that young people understand that they do not need to drink/do drugs to fit in, have fun, or deal with the pressures of growing up. Below are more resources to help you navigate conversations with your teen about substance abuse.

Studies show that marijuana interferes with attention, motivation, memory, and learning. Students who use marijuana regularly tend to get lower grades and are more likely to drop out of high school than those who don’t use. Those who use it regularly may be functioning at a reduced intellectual level most or all of the time.

Most young people ages 12 to 20 do not drink. However, in 2012, about 9.3 million young people in this age group, or one out of four, had used alcohol. Alcohol use can interfere with their health, academic, and workplace performance and their relationships with friends and family.

Talk with young people early and often about the dangers of underage drinking. With your help, we can make sure that young people understand that they do not need to drink to fit in, have fun, or deal with the pressures of growing up. Use the resources on this site to help young people be too smart to start.

How Much Alcohol is Too Much? Learn more here:

Alcohol Screening

The following free resources are available from SAMHSA:

20% of people, 12 years and older, have abused or misused prescription medication in their lifetimes. Most teens, who report abusing prescription medication, get these drugs from friends and relatives, at times without the person knowing.

Monitor:

  • Know how many pills are in your medication bottles.
  • Note your refills and your teens. Ask yourself if you are refilling medications more often than expected.
  • Talk to friends and family members about the importance of monitoring their medications.
  • Turn The Tide RX